Friday, April 14, 2017

What Food Expiry Dates Really Mean? Food Waste Epidemic- Visual Asset

Did you know that 33% of the world’s food is wasted and lack of knowledge about expiry dates plays a big role in that? In the United States, $218 billion is spent every year on food that is never eaten.



Shared with Sustain2Green by email

GreenChill Webinar: Strategies for Reducing Refrigeration System Charge Size

GreenChill Webinar: Strategies for Reducing Refrigeration System Charge Size


Topic: Strategies for Reducing Refrigeration System Charge Size
Date: Tuesday, May 9, 2017
Time: 2:00 pm to 3:00pm (Eastern time)
 
-------------------------------------------------------
Description:
-------------------------------------------------------
 
Please join us for a GreenChill webinar on Tuesday, May 9 from 2:00pm to 3:00pm Eastern. Representatives from Meijer, a food retailer with stores in six states, will describe how the company has reduced the amount of refrigerant used in their commercial refrigeration systems, and the benefits of these reductions.
 
-------------------------------------------------------
To join the webinar:
-------------------------------------------------------
 
2. Select "Enter as a Guest". It is important that you select the option to enter as a guest.
3. Enter your name.
4. Click "Enter Room".
5. Click "OK".
 
-------------------------------------------------------
For audio:
-------------------------------------------------------
 
1. Call the toll free call-in number: 1-866-299-3188 (706-758-1822 from outside the U.S.)
2. Use Conference Code: 202 343 9185#
 

Shared with Sustain2Green by email

Friday, March 31, 2017

IEEE International Conference on Networks & Advances in Computational


With great pleasure, we hereby inform you that Computer Society of India Trivandrum Chapter and Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Mar Baselios College of Engineering and Technology, Trivandrum, Kerala, India is jointly organizing an IEEE International Conference on Networks & Advances in Computational Technologies (NetACT 2017) during 20-22, July 2017, in association with Bowie State University USA, Gannon University USA, Malardalen University Sweden and IEEE Kerala Section. 
  
The technical program of the conference consists of three parallel tracks in the following broad areas: 
1.      Distributed and Parallel Processing 
2.      Advanced Software Engineering 
3.      Computer Graphics and Image Processing 
4.      Network and Security 
5.      Data Analytics 
  
The conference papers will be published in IEEE Xplore. The conference will include a number of invited talks on important and current topics from eminent speakers. 
  
NetACT 17 is envisaged to provide a platform for researchers, academicians, professionals and students to share and explore innovative ideas and technological advancements in the area of Computer Science and Engineering. 
  
Authors are invited to submit original unpublished full papers by electronic submission. All papers should be submitted through 'Easychair' using the link http://netact17.in/call_for_papers.html . Accepted papers MUST be presented at the conference by one of the authors. In case, if none of the authors is able to attend, it should be done by a qualified surrogate. 
  
For more details, refer to the conference web site   http://netact17.in/
Direct your queries if any, regarding the paper submission or any other matter to the email id:  netact17@gmail.com
  
Thanks 
  
Vishnukumar S 
(Technical Programme Chair, NetAct 17)    

Thursday, March 30, 2017

What’s the current impact of construction on the environment?

It is thought that around half of all non-renewable resources we use are used in construction. It’s this fact that makes it one of the least sustainable industries on the globe.
But construction is of course, is a complete necessity. Everything from the roads we travel on to the houses in which we live need to be constructed, and usually, the materials needed to construct them are non-renewable. So how do we pivot and change our construction methods and materials to have less of a damaging effect on the environment around us and create a sustainable world for future generations?
Here, Raised Floor Solutions, look at sustainable building and its future.
What’s the current impact of construction on the environment?
Traditional construction methods are affecting the environment in a number of ways:
Global warming and climate change: Over the past 100 years the Earth has warmed. This can be attributed to an increase in the concentration of certain greenhouse gases, chief of which is carbon dioxide, which is most often produced when a fossil fuel is burnt to produce energy. In the UK around half of the national energy use is related to the construction industry. Fossil fuel energy is used in producing materials, the construction process, and by the occupants of a building throughout its life.
Resource depletion: Construction, as an industry, often uses stone and primary aggregates. Through extracting these resources major damage to the ecosystem, local habitat, and landscape occurs.
Pollution to the natural environment: Within construction, pollution to the environment happens in a number of ways. From sewage & waste from a construction site to pollution caused by the manufacturing of materials for a construction site - each activity poses a risk of introducing pollutants and potentially toxic materials to the local environment, workers on site, the neighbourhood, and the wildlife.
Land-use and conservation: Through construction and interaction with land-use the biodiversity of particular sites can be ruined. Quarrying operations can push traffic numbers up and even in completed developments the day to day use of new buildings or projects can severely harm a fragile local environment.
What is sustainable construction?
For the first time in human history, over half the world’s population now live in urban environments, urban environments that heavily rely on construction that drains resources and severely impact the surrounding environment. The problem is that it’s getting worse. Urban populations are growing the world over, requiring more and more from construction. There has never before been such a need to consider new ideas in the way we construct houses, shopping centres, roads, offices, car parks, train stations, and more.
Sustainable construction is all about utilising the latest in these ideas to create buildings that do little to no harm to the environment. The aim is to meet our present-day demands for infrastructure, housing, and places of work without compromising the environment for future generations. Sustainable development looks to take on three broad themes known as the ‘triple bottom line’. They are: environment, social, and economic accountability.
The payoff and the drawbacks
The benefits of sustainable construction are obvious, but one issue often cited is that of cost. Modern technologies, appliances, and methods often cost more money to use and implement. The reality, however, is that while the up-front cost is higher the overall life-cycle cost is significantly lower. Not to mention the broader advantages of reduced greenhouse gases.  Studies have also found that productivity in workers operating within green buildings is higher - a cleaner, healthier, and brighter workspace makes a much happier workforce.
Overall sustainable development, when implemented correctly, can improve water efficiency, material efficiency, reduce waste, optimise maintenance operations, reduce the impact upon electricity networks, and minimise damage to the surrounding wildlife.
What’s the current state of sustainable construction?
Worldwide there are currently a number of organisations that have developed codes, rating systems, and standards. Governments can now use these codes and standards to help implement sustainable construction into their practices.
There are rating systems used within each country. For example, the UK has a system called BREEAM. The United States uses one named LEED and Spain, VERDE. These systems award credits for optional features of a building that support green initiatives such as water conservation or building materials.
What does the future hold?
Now we understand the importance of green & sustainable building, it’s time to look to its future. What trends could emerge? Which countries will embrace the technologies and skill-sets that sustainable buildings require? Whose technology could change the construction industry?
In the past few years we have seen a stronger increase in retrofit energy efficiency rather than energy efficient new-builds. This signifies that even in existing building sites we’re looking to adapt ourselves to help create a sustainable world. It also shows that there’s a better understanding than ever before that, in the long-run, sustainable buildings sap less energy, which in turn saves homeowners, businesses, and governments money. 
We mentioned earlier the rating systems used around the world. As sustainable construction moves forward, the competition amongst such rating systems can only help move them forward. BREEAM, for example, isn’t just used within the UK, but is marketed across Western Europe, Mexico, and could soon enter use in the US.
As we start to really feel the impact of global warming it’s becoming clearer how important it is to implement greener methods. Because of this, governments the world over are putting the pressure on construction companies to implement greener methods and technology with every build. This, we hope, should help influence a rapid increase in sustainable builds in cities across the globe.


Shared with Sustain2Green by email.

Thursday, March 23, 2017

Apps for your Health - Infographic

Apps for your Health - Infographic


Shared by Sustain2Green by email.

 http://www.assignmentkingdom.com/ 

Infographic – What can we learn from the Flint Water Crisis?

Infographic – What can we learn from the Flint Water Crisis?
The Michigan city of Flint is only beginning to recover from the water crisis which has seen thousands of children fall sick from lead contamination after drinking from the Flint River’s water supply and almost $400 million worth of aid granted to the city to remedy the crisis.
What’s most shocking about the crisis, though, is the unscrupulous catalogue of actions from local, state and federal governments in response to the problem. The city switched its water supply from Detroit to the local river to save $5 million, a miniscule amount considering the potential health risks posed to its population from an unsafe water source. There was also an abundance of buck-passing from people in authority, whose unwillingness to accept responsibility and take timely action exacerbated the crisis. Indeed, some state officials even railed against citizens who took a stand and spoke out about their plight.

This infographic from The Water Filter Men (https://www.thewaterfiltermen.ie/) looks at how the crisis unfolded and attempts to explain how it was let to develop to such an epidemic degree. It also highlights important lessons that other cities and states can learn from the failings of those who should have handled the Flint Water Crisis in a far more competent and responsible manner. This was a sorry tale of greed being valued over people’s health and welfare.

Please find the infographic at the following link.

http://www.sustain2green.com/2017/03/what-can-we-learn-from-flint-water.html

Shared with Sustain2Green by email.

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

GreenChill Webinar: International Institute of Ammonia Refrigeration’s Resources for Using NH3 and CO2


DATE CHANGE: Due to a change in the presenter’s schedule, the April 18 GreenChill webinar has been rescheduled for Tuesday, MAY 2. If you did not receive a cancellation notice about the April 18 date, please go ahead and remove it from your calendar.

 
Topic: International Institute of Ammonia Refrigeration’s Resources for Using NH3 and CO2
Date: Tuesday, April 18, 2017
Time: 2:00 pm to 3:00pm (Eastern time)
-------------------------------------------------------
Description:
-------------------------------------------------------
Please join us for a GreenChill webinar on Tuesday, April 18 from 2:00pm to 3:00pm Eastern. Eric Smith and Dave Sainato from the International Institute of Ammonia Refrigeration (IIAR) will discuss the IIAR’s scope and mission. This will include the development of guidelines and standards, research projects, and other efforts that should benefit the application of small charge ammonia systems and CO2 systems. They will discuss the perceived benefits and detractions of using ammonia as a primary refrigerant as well as IIAR’s efforts in code development, education and international outreach.
-------------------------------------------------------
To join the webinar:
-------------------------------------------------------
2. Select "Enter as a Guest". It is important that you select the option to enter as a guest.
3. Enter your name.
4. Click "Enter Room".
5. Click "OK".
-------------------------------------------------------
For audio:
-------------------------------------------------------
1. Call the toll free call-in number: 1-866-299-3188 (706-758-1822 from outside the U.S.)
2. Use Conference Code: 202 343 9185#

Shared with Sustain2Green by email.

What can we learn from the : Flint Water Crisis - Infographic

What can we learn from the : Flint Water Crisis - Infographic

Shared with Sustain2Green by email.

http://www.thewaterfiltermen.ie/

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

The E-Waste Problem, And How To Help

We can joke about how often we feel the need to upgrade our smartphones, but the fact of the matter is that what happens to our old cellphones and other electronics is no laughing matter. Nearly 60 percent of e-waste — unwanted electronics such as computers, TVs and cell phones — end up in landfills around the world, where the toxic chemicals used in their manufacture can contaminate the environment. Other e-waste is incinerated, releasing clouds of noxious chemicals into the air. Many times, developing countries bear the most significant brunt of the health and ecological problems caused by e-waste. Dealing with e-waste has become one of the most pressing problems facing the world in the 21st century, and although progress has been made in terms of recycling and disposing of e-waste responsibly, there is still a lot of work to be done. Even at the level of the individual consumer, there are steps that can be taken to reduce the amount of e-waste and deal with it properly, and responsible consumers can make a difference. The following infographic details some of the main reasons why e-waste has become such a concern around the world, as well as some of the steps consumers can take to reduce the amount of electronics that become e-waste.
Infographic created by Digital Doc

Shared with Sustain2Green by email.
http://www.wikio.co.uk