Friday, December 21, 2012

California is the world’s largest economy and the state has managed to sell all its carbon permits. Edison International made a mistake while bidding for the allowances


California is the world’s largest economy and the state has managed to sell all its carbon permits. Edison International made a mistake while bidding for the allowances. 

See the World in Glorious Green


See the World in Glorious Green
Travel is more than the seeing of sights; it is a change that goes on, deep and permanent, in the ideas of living.” – Miriam Beard
There are multiple reasons why people decide to take a trip, from relaxation to self-discovery. Whether you’re taking time to chill out or trek through the Amazon, there are countless reasons why you should be eco-conscious when it comes to planning your next big adventure.
 It’s important to make sure you leave a place exactly how it was before you got there; ensuring that what attracted you in the first place is still intact for generations to come. You can turn any trip green by making a few simple tweaks or considerations before you even leave your home. Being aware of your surroundings will not only make for an unforgettable trip for you, but for others who have yet to visit.
 Here’s some ways you can instantly become a “green” traveler:
 1.           Pack reusable containers and bags
Having reusable containers handy on trips can help greatly cut down excess waste. Pack your own shampoo and toiletries instead of throwing out hotel samples, and fill your own water bottles instead of buying plastic ones (especially in countries without a recycling program). Also, consider bringing your own bags to local markets and grocery stores to cut down on plastic and paper waste.
2.            Check out the Green Hotels Association
Before booking a hotel, check out the “Green” Hotels Association. It’s full of great tips on how to find eco-friendly spots and has a list of hotels that are committed to maintaining green properties through water and energy conservation and more.
3.            Buy locally
While abroad, look for local farmer’s markets or kiosks and buy local produce or goods. Not only will you be stimulating the local economy and giving back to the community, you are not creating waste by eating at a restaurant or getting packaged food at the grocery store. If you have a kitchen in your hotel room or hostel, make your own meals when you can.
4.            Take the bus
When it comes to getting from Point A to Point B around town, skip the taxi or rental car and take public transportation. Subways, trains, and buses drastically help cut down on pollution and are totally affordable. They also offer a unique glimpse into the everyday lives of the city or town’s citizens.
5.            Have hotel etiquette
While it’s easy to throw in the towel while you’re on vacation, try to stay conscious of your actions inside your hotel room. Instead of getting new towels every day, rehang and reuse the towels already in the room. Room service and take-out can sound luxurious after a day of sight-seeing and exploring, but they both bring with them excess packaging, plastic, and waste. It’s also good to pay attention to the temperature in your room. Don’t keep the heat or air conditioning blasting all day when you’re not in the room. Conserve energy and make sure to turn off everything (T.V., lights, heater, etc.) before you head out on your day's adventure.
6.            Volunteer
Many tour companies offer volunteer packages and tie-ins with trips. There are a variety of programs set up for travelers to help build homes, work at orphanages, or stay on a farm in places all around the globe. A quick search on the internet yields a variety of volunteer programs. Be sure to do your research before signing up by reaching out on message boards and other forums.
Knowing that you’re doing your part to help the environment, no matter where you are, will make your trip all the more memorable. Happy travels!
Angie Picardo is a staff writer for NerdWallet, a website dedicated to helping consumers find the best travel credit cards.  

Bigger berths in state-of-the-art LNG facility


Bigger berths in state-of-the-art LNG facility

A state-of-the-art LNG facility in the United Kingdom handles ever-larger ships safely and efficiently.

As its own North Sea gas supplies dwindle, the UK has been forced to import increasing volumes from foreign producers. This trend, together with the growing size of the vessels that transport the gas, has led to an expansion of the UK’s liquefied natural gas (LNG) infrastructure and the upgrade of the terminals that handle imports. 
At the National Grid Grain LNG facility on the River Medway east of London, England, a multimillion-pound project was conducted to build a marine jetty facility to enable the latest breed of Q-Flex and Q-Max LNG vessels – the largest of their type – to berth and discharge their cargo.
Trelleborg had previously supplied a complete mooring system for the original jetty as part of a major upgrade. For the new project, Trelleborg was contracted by Volker Construction International to supply several docking, mooring and fendering products for the terminal, which is one of five strategically located LNG sites in the UK. Trelleborg also worked with the main contractor, Chicago Bridge and Iron, to supply monitoring instrumentation for the project. 
“Since the installation of the fender systems, hooks and monitoring systems from Trelleborg, we’ve been most impressed with their after-sales service,” says Simon Culkin, Terminal Manager at Grain LNG. “Not only has the equipment supplied worked well, but the aftercare has been excellent throughout. If we pick up the phone, we know that they’ll be willing and able to come and help us immediately.”
Trelleborg has a large market share for these kinds of solutions globally. “We have considerable expertise in integrated projects such as Grain LNG,” says Simon Wilson, Managing Director of the part of Trelleborg that deals with docking and mooring systems in Melbourne, Australia. 

“We have supplied our products to most of the LNG berths in the UK,” adds Mark Fowler, Sales Office Manager for this product in the UK and who handled supply of Super Cone Fenders to the project. “As far as the client was concerned, we were a one-stop shop. We have the product scope, and we supplied the full package under one umbrella.”
The products supplied by Trelleborg – including Quick Release Hooks, Smartdock Docking Aid Systems, Super Cone Fenders, Environmental Monitoring Systems, Load Monitoring and Remote Release – are crucial for the safe and efficient operation of a facility such as National Grid Grain LNG. Each of the huge vessels that docks there carries a cargo worth about USD 20 million and costs about USD 130,000 a day to lease. “The vessel and its cargo represent a significant expense, and neither vessel owner nor the terminal operator wants to see it sitting around,” says Wilson. “So making sure that your mooring and monitoring equipment is fully operational is a very good investment.”
In addition to the hardware, Trelleborg provided expertise and advice before the project got under way and has followed the installation with after-sales services. “Because of our experience with integrated systems and especially LNG we are able to bring a broad range of industry best practices to the development of project specifications,” says Wilson. “We provide technical assistance, feedback and proposals, and once the equipment has been supplied we have an after-sales team that provides a whole suite of services and spare parts. We can assist on the maintenance of the equipment, we do site audits, and we also offer specialized training services.” 
Fowler expects both the LNG sector and Trelleborg’s presence in it to continue growing over the coming decades. “In 2009, the UK imported about 30 percent of its consumption,” he says. “And according to government forecasts this will rise to 80 percent by 2020, and whether that can be achieved with the five existing terminals is debatable. So, I would expect some form of expansion, whether it’s expansion of existing sites with new berths or new sites. Trelleborg is well placed to support that expansion with our hardware and expertise.” 

National Grid 
Grain LNG terminal
• Commissioned in 2005 as an LNG importation facility.
• Receives and unloads LNG ships, stores LNG in cryogenic tanks, re-gasifies LNG and sends gas into the national transmission and local distribution systems.
• Expansion of the terminal, tripling capacity to 9.8 million tons a year (12 percent of UK gas demand), was completed in 2010. The site now has three of the world’s biggest above ground full-containment LNG storage tanks and is able to take the world’s largest LNG carrier, the Q-Max.
• LNG is an ideal way to transport and store gas. When cooled to –161 degrees Celsius, it becomes a liquid and takes up 600 times less space than as a gas.


For more information 
please contact:
news@trelleborg.com 

Thursday, December 20, 2012

Tesla Motors Inc. is trying to become profitable by trying to make higher end models of model S sedan ( electric car). The company is run by billionaire Elon Musk.


Tesla Motors Inc. is trying to become profitable by trying to make higher end models of model S sedan. The company is run by billionaire Elon Musk. It is an electric car.

Agriculture - a sector guranteed to grow


Agriculture - a sector guranteed to grow

If there’s one sector guaranteed to grow in both the short and long term, it’s agriculture. 

With the world population expected to grow by 27 percent to 8.9 billion by 2050 and consumers in developing markets increasingly able to afford more and different foodstuffs, demand for agricultural products is certain to rise. “You can’t open an agricultural publication today without seeing references to population growth and rising living standards,” says Joe Woods, Fluid Power Segment Manager Americas for Trelleborg’s sealing products, who himself farms on a modest scale. 
The amount of arable land available on the planet is limited, so it must be as productive as possible. A number of trends are resulting in greater productivity . 
In developed markets one trend is the increasing automation of farm machinery such as combine harvesters. Combine harvesters can now be steered by GPS, and subsystems such as the headers that harvest the crops are increasingly computer controlled. “An operator used to throw a lever to manually raise and lower a header,” says Woods. “Now there’s a button controlling the hydraulic cylinder. For its smooth operation you need lower friction and higher precision, which our seals provide.” 
Trelleborg is experiencing high growth in the agricultural sector. “Business with original equipment manufacturers is booming,” says Woods. “Commodity prices are up in the U.S., and demand is driving when people are buying new equipment.”
Another way to increase land productivity is to prevent damage to the soil by tractors and other machinery. “Compression by tires affects the structure of the soil, affecting its ability to absorb water and nutrients and therefore affecting yields,” says Emiliana Vesco, Product Manager Agricultural and Forest Tires for Trelleborg. Tests show that compaction causes poor root development and disrupts biological activity in the land. “Our aim is to design and produce tires that respect the structure of the soil and preserve its organic life by minimizing mechanical damage,” says Vesco. 

Agricultural vehicles are becoming more environmentally-friendly, with stricter emissions standards going into effect in the U.S. and Europe. Their engines run hotter to reduce emissions, which demands components that can handle the higher temperatures. “We now supply high-temperature compounds for engine mounts,” says Chris Billinge, Global Markets Director for Trelle-borg’s antivibration mounts. “This allows our customers to run their engines in these hotter environments and still have excellent isolation.” 
With demand increasing in some markets for vehicles fitted with tracks rather than tires – again to protect the soil – Trelleborg is developing new solutions for suspension systems. “Tracks cause a massive deterioration in ride control and comfort, so the focus is on suspension to allow drivers to spend a long day in the field comfortably,” says Billinge. 
Sustainable farming remains a focus for Trelleborg. In 2011, Trelle-borg launched its TM Blue tire concept, which reduces the use of natural resources in production, is kinder on the soil while reducing fuel consumption and emissions as well as increasing productivity. “Agriculture is destined to play a leading role in future environmental challenges, since farmers, along with leading manufacturers, increasingly demand innovations that meet sustainable requirements,” says Vesco. 
According to forecasts, 80 percent of the growth in the agricultural industry through 2020 will occur in the BRIC countries (Brazil, Russia, India and China). A significant amount of farming in China is still unmechanized, and where machinery is used it is often less productive than in the developed world. In 2011, Trelleborg acquired a facility in Xingtai and became the first manufacturer of agricultural tires from the West to have its own production in China. The factory provides proximity to Chinese customers as well as support to European and U.S. customers in the Chinese market. “This is a new horizon that brings us new possibilities and a new challenge,” says Vesco. 

Agriculture in South Africa 
South Africa grows every kind of food crop, filling most of the country’s domestic needs and exporting on top of that, so it is no surprise that demand for tractors is growing, along with associated markets. 
“In 2011, sales of tractors in South Africa almost doubled over 2010 
levels, reaching 7,963 units,” says Hennie Hattingh, Trelleborg Sales Manager for agricultural tires in South Africa and Sub-Saharan Africa. “Trelleborg’s biggest opportunity lies in affiliation with tractor dealers.”
Hattingh says South Africa is the most important market in Africa for now, but opportunities are arising in other markets as well. With rising tractor sales come rising tire sales.
“In recent years, there has been an increased focus on precision farming, meaning minimizing soil compaction for maximum agronomic yield,” Hattingh says.
One farmer who understands this is Piet van Rensburg, a fourth-generation farmer in Bultfontein, in South Africa’s Free State province. The province, considered the breadbasket of the country, produces 70 percent of South Africa’s grain. 
On his Mooitoekoms Farm, van Rensburg uses Trelleborg TM900 High Power tires on his Case Magnum 340 and Magnum 225 tractors.
“I work in very sandy soil,” says van Rensburg. “And the bigger the tire I can have, the less compaction and more traction there is on the soil. I can’t complain about the life-span of the tires either. I am up to 3,000 hours on the Magnum 225. Trelleborg tires make me more productive and increase the fuel efficiency of my vehicles.” 

Mooitoekoms Farm
• The word “mooitoekoms” in the name of Piet van Rensburg’s farm means “beautiful future” in Afrikaans.
• The Free State province is often called South Africa’s breadbasket.
• Mooitoekoms Farm’s main crops are maize and sunflowers.
• The total area of the farm is 1,400 hectares (3,460 acres).
• Mooitoekoms Farm has four tractors: a Case Steiger 550, a Case Magnum 340, a Case Magnum 225 and a Case Puma 180 for spraying.

South African farming
• The top 10 farmed commodities in South Africa are sugarcane, maize (corn), milk, wheat, potatoes, grapes, oranges, chicken, sunflower seeds and beef.
• Farming in South Africa accounts for eight percent of the country’s exports.
• 12 percent of South Africa’s land is under cultivation, amounting to some 15 million hectares (36 million acres).
• 96 percent of all tractor brands imported to South Africa have radial tires.
• Trelleborg has had a presence in South Africa since 1995. Its offices there act as a hub for Trelleborg business in other African countries.

India – a thriving market
With a population of 1.2 billion that is still growing rapidly, India is a critical market for many global companies. Trelleborg has several facilities in India and another one will be inaugurated later this year. 
This latest addition to the country is a 30,000-square-foot facility in southern India. It will develop, manufacture and supply industrial antivibration systems with a focus on rail and molded components for a variety of industry segments as well as housing a test laboratory for materials and product testing.
“Our operations in India will strengthen our relationships with our key customers and help us develop business with others,” says Rajeev Gupta, Regional Sales Manager for Trelleborg’s antivibration systems. “The plan is to support the strategy of future business growth in the Indian market.”
Agriculture is a big part of that market in India. Some 80 percent of the machines used in agriculture in India are tractors. 
“The large agricultural market of India is one that we will be watching closely and participating in when technology develops and brings into play the need for our products,” says Chris Billinge who is responsible for marketing Trelleborg antivibration systems globally.
In India, Trelleborg develops, manufactures and supplies hydraulic and pneumatic sealing systems for the fluid power, automotive and aerospace sectors as well as industrial antivibration systems and molded components for a variety of industry segments. In addition to this, Trelleborg has a center of excellence for engineering and design focusing in marine fender operations. 

The tractor factor
The name “tractor”, coined around 1903 by Hart and Parr, developers of a two-cylinder gasoline engine, comes from the Latin roots of “traction” and “power”. This sums its capabilities up as a slow moving, high torque vehicle for hauling a trailer or machinery.
Before this tractors were already in use, but not by their common name. Originally, there were steam-powered traction engines, frequently operated in tandem pulling a plow back and forth over a field by a wire cable. In the U.S., steam-powered engines were direct-hauling plows due to more favorable soil conditions.
Steam-powered tractors were still in use during the 20th century until a reliable internal combustion engine was developed. Gasoline-powered tractors gained popularity in the 1910s when they became smaller and cheaper. In 1917, Henry Ford introduced the Fordson, the first mass produced tractor, and by the 1920s this type of tractor had become the norm, with Ford controlling 77 percent of the U.S. market.

For more information 
please contact:
news@trelleborg.com 

According to a new study the used oil fields in US are capable of holding billions of tons of carbon dioxide.


According to a new study the used oil fields in US are capable of holding billions of tons of carbon dioxide. This is much more than previously estimated and this can help the country to reduce CO2 emissions and increase its domestic fuels production.

Rajendra Shende (Chairman TERRE Policy Centre, Former Director UNEP ) with French Green Party, Petroleum Industry Association of France and a journalist. Listen to the game-changer and transition strategy for the world.


30+ minute France24 TV programme ( english) on year-end-review programme on energy and environment . It will feature Rajendra Shende (Chairman TERRE Policy Centre, 
Former Director UNEP )  with French Green Party, Petroleum Industry Association of France and a journalist. Listen to the game-changer and transition strategy for the world. 

The show will air December 27th at 7h10pm, 0h10am & 3h10 am Paris time.It can also be seen on-line ( iPhone and iPAD and Android if you down load France24)  live and later as archive.

According to a report by Bloomberg, the poor in India are eating less than they were eating about two decades back.


According to a report by Bloomberg, the poor in India are eating less than they were eating about two decades back. This is in spite of the economic progress that the country has made. 

California is trying to be the greenest U.S. state. The state is also on its becoming a key oil producer.


California is trying to be the greenest U.S. state. The state is also on its becoming a key oil producer. It can soon take over the top position from Texas. This would also help US to become self-reliant on oil.

Tuesday, December 18, 2012

Take EPA Expert Quiz Now!


The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has always played a central role in the Environmental Compliance, EH&S and Sustainability arenas. Since its creation over 30 years ago, whether developing and enforcing regulations, giving grants or publishing studies and research, the EPA has been a part of our professional lives in one way or another.
What better way to celebrate such a central institution than to test your knowledge about it? Just because you use the name every day, doesn't mean you are an EPA expert. Or does it?
Take our challenge and have fun with it! 10 Questions - 3 min to play!
Send it to your colleagues and start a competition in your office. You can compare scores, post your scores online or even print your certificate.
Share this educational resource with your friends and colleagues:

Sent by email to Sustain2Green by Enviance

Watch your carbon footprint or watch your custom fall


Watch your carbon footprint or watch your custom fall
Before the recession there was increasing emphasis put on a business’ carbon footprint; companies and corporations of all sizes used to strive to reduce theirs, and even people at home tried their best to play their part. But as money got scarcer and jobs looked increasingly shaky for many people the importance of a business’ carbon footprint was put on the proverbial backburner.
For many companies this means that it’s possible to do nothing to appear green and get away with it for the most part – even if your business is named and shamed as being less environmentally friendly than others you at the very least have an excuse. The flipside of this is that companies that are playing their part and doing their best to be kinder to nature are getting extra plaudits; and rightly so, since there are some simple and cost-effective ways to do this.
One easy way to go green is to recycle; something which many companies have continued to do despite the current economic crisis, since it’s inexpensive for some and free for others. The pervading attitude seems to state that recycling is less important than it was a few years ago, but this is absolutely not the case.
Switching to more sustainable energy sources is something that is not free initially, but can pay dividends in the long run; not only in contributions to your energy bills, but also in the lessened impact on the environment. Commercial PV systems by Dulas can subsidise the running costs of large buildings, as well as often being prominently displayed on the outside so it’s easy to see that your company is making an effort to go green.

Monday, December 10, 2012

REDD Text Limps Out Of Doha – Heavy, Homeless, And Broke


REDD Text Limps Out Of Doha – Healthy, Homeless, And Broke
Author: Steve Zwick


7 December 2012 | Doha | Qatar | High-level climate talks continue here and may run until Monday, but negotiations on reducing emissions from deforestation and degradation (REDD) appear to have wrapped up for the year. 

Some parts of the text are now complete, and these are embedded in the most recent outcome of the Advanced Working Group on Long-Term Cooperative Action (AWG-LCA) – the negotiating track created at COP 13 in Bali, Indonesia and slated to end today. 

Other parts of the text remain unfinished, and these are now on the agenda for the next meetings of the Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technological Advice (SBSTA) and the Subsidiary Body for Implementation (SBI), which take place in Bonn, Germany in June. 

The critical issue of results-based finance will be picked up at workshops headed by two co-chairs – one from the developed world and one from the developing world, both appointed by the President of the COP.

That leaves the mechanism with $5.35 billion in public funds committed and $2.24 billion acknowledged and spent by both developed and developing countries, according to the REDD Database but that doesn't include the $500 million each pledged by Norway and the UK.

The Final Outcome

The "final" LCA text is available here, but several parties have already voiced objections to key provisions. Pargraphs 25 through 40, however, have not been challenged, and these are the paragraphs related to REDD. 

The text recognizes the need to talk about “ways to incentivize non-carbon benefits,” such as water filtration, biodiversity preservation, and the support of forest peoples, and it also calls on SBSTA and SBI to build a home for REDD by the end of 2013 – for, with the Kyoto Protocol negotiating track wrapping up Thursday and LCA wrapping up today, everything rolls over to the Ad Hoc Working Group on the Durban Platform for Enhanced Action (AWG-ADP), which is to deliver a binding global agreement by 2015 to be implemented no later than 2020.

Building A Home

Coming into Doha, REDD talks were split between SBSTA, LCA, and the Subsidiary Body for Implementation (SBI), and the Doha talks were supposed to create a roadmap for the ADP. When it became clear that wasn’t going to happen, however, Papua New-Guinea (PNG) pushed for the creation of a new “REDD Committee” that would house all REDD talks. PNG created a detailed, three-page proposal that was gradually whittled down to a few bullet points and then banished to SBSTA and pushed off to June.  

Also left unresolved is how emission-reduction results will be verified. Last week, Norway pushed for third-party verifiers “drawn from the roster of experts,” referring to experts in both developed and developing countries, as opposed to the Consultative Group of Experts (CGE), which is a roster of experts which is balanced in favor of developing countries. 

Brazil balked, arguing instead for a continuation of the International Consultations and Analysis (ICA) process, which is substantially softer on developing countries. 

Brazil says it will deliver a formal counterproposal at the next SBSTA meeting.

The REDD Committee

As proposed, the REDD Committee would include members of developed and developing countries, and is aimed at creating a standardized REDD “product” within the UNFCCC that would send a clear signal on the value of forests to both governments around the world and the global private sector. 

Many delegates say the formation of such a committee is inevitable, but several said there simply wasn’t time to discuss it at these talks.
Steve Zwick is the Managing Editor of Ecosystem Marketplace. He can be reached at szwick@ecosystemmarketplace.com


http://www.ecosystemmarketplace.com/pages/dynamic/article.page.php?page_id=9475&section=news_articles&eod=1

The new Volvo FH – a major challenge for Volvo Trucks’ designers


The new Volvo FH – a major challenge for Volvo Trucks’ designers

Truck design is about much more than just colour, shape and attractive lines. Behind the new, safer, larger and more ergonomically optimised Volvo FH lies a significant design challenge. “Coming up with solutions where design and function go hand in hand was one of our most important tasks,” says Rikard Orell, Design Director at Volvo Trucks. 

From the first stroke of his pen on the drawing board to complete truck, the process took just over five years. Several thousand hours and at least an equal number of decisions and procedures later it was finally ready – the new Volvo FH. 
“The design challenge we were given was to create something that was exciting and fresh, while at the same time retaining and carrying over all those elements that were so highly appreciated in the previous model,” relates Rikard Orell. 
In practice what the Göteborg-based design group had to do was to find solutions in which all the individual parts of the truck interlinked smoothly with each other and created a single cohesive feel. Every visible surface, inside as well as out, was examined in minute detail by the design department. So too were the sounds and tactile feel of the buttons and controls, the structure of the textiles and the in-cab lighting – all were tailored to meet the high demands and expectations of an all-new Volvo FH. Demands that are expressed in parameters such as tough standards regarding safety and driver’s environment.

“There is sometimes this misunderstanding regarding design – that it’s simply about appearance, about colour and shape. The reality is that design and function must go hand in hand. The designer’s task is to come up with solutions that make all the component parts of the truck – both the hardware and the software – join together in a single, cohesive visual and functional entity,” explains Rikard Orell. 

One early stage of the design process required the design team to find an expression and an identity for the new truck. Shapes and lines were exaggerated with the aim of finding the overall visual message that the team wanted to convey. 
“The first thing that was discussed was the various technical needs, but the basic drive during the concept phase has consistently been to advance and to increase the cab’s interior volume,” relates Rikard Orell.
Asok George, Chief Designer Exterior at Volvo Trucks and one of the team members, relates that work on the design of the new truck started with a pen on a sketchpad. And there was plenty of scope for giving his imagination a free rein. 
“My inspiration came from everything from new technology and nature to Volvo’s heritage and Scandinavian culture and design. But my biggest source of inspiration by far was the drivers who actually use our trucks,” he says. 
As the work progressed, the sketches moved into computer-generated models and the design took on more realistic lines. 
“In the field of design it’s often all about the details. When you look at the truck it should have a design that instinctively feels just right,” says Asok George. “It’s the basic shape, the stance and the proportions that are crucial. All lines and curves should flow naturally and there mustn’t be anything that disrupts the eye,” he says. 
In order to achieve this, the design group used physical clay models, both full-size and scale models. “Because even if modern computer programs help the designer to visualise his or her visions and ideas – the virtual tools are not always enough,” explains Asok George.

“In the computer the designer uses more of his or her analytical skills, but when working with clay models it’s more emotional, everything comes from the heart. For me it’s the combination of these two approaches that generates a perfect design,” he says.
Having said that, even if the creative aspect is an important part of the design of a new truck, it isn’t everything. The demands on the vehicle’s appearance must also dovetail with a variety of technical requirements and demands from the truck’s operating environment, for instance that the new FH must have a larger cab than its predecessor to enhance both comfort and driver safety. 

In order to monitor driver needs, an important part of the design process involved interviewing drivers at truck stops throughout Europe. They got to sit in early mock-up models of the new Volvo FH and their feedback was subsequently used to refine and modify the design to satisfy driver needs. 
“It makes no difference how many skilled designers or engineers we have at Volvo Trucks,” says Claes Hillén, who is responsible for driver interviews and customer clinics at the product development department. “We can never exactly understand precisely what a driver’s everyday working situation is like. The only way to gain an insight into their day-to-day reality is by asking them,” he says. 
All told more than 2000 drivers were interviewed over a five-year period and together they provided hundreds of years of first-hand experience from truck driving. 
One clear wish that the drivers expressed was for more and larger storage compartments. This meant the cab had to be bigger. And this in turn meant that the previously so characteristically raked-back A-pillars – a Volvo FH hallmark – had to be made more upright. So the design team worked hard on sloping lines and a slanting roof so as to retain the dynamic FH profile. The result is a cab that is now one cubic metre bigger and offers 300 litres more storage space. This also means the seat can slide back a further four centimetres, and in an accident there is more survival space than ever before. 
“This is precisely what design is all about for me: ensuring that the product we create actually is tailored to the specific needs of the people who will use it,” says Rikard Orell. “That means not only going with the rational choices, since we human beings are not only rational but also very emotional. For a driver it’s a matter of being able to live and operate comfortably in the truck and also about feeling a sense of pride in the job. The truck’s functional and dynamic design has the task of contributing to that,” he adds.

Another example of the way design and function go hand in hand to improve safety in the truck is the new rear-view mirrors. In the new model they are attached to slimmer arms than before and the large cover surrounding the glass has been deleted. 
“This solution reduces the number of blind spots for the driver so the safety gains are immense. What’s more, I feel the new design also gives significant aesthetic benefits,” says Rikard Orell. 
One important factor to bear in mind during the design process was that the new truck had to retain its distinctive Volvo profile. That typical Volvo design, based on low-key Scandinavian colours, simple elegance and efficient lines – played the lead role. 
“The result is a truck that is honest, straightforward, without unnecessary adornment. Everything you see is there for a reason. Although we’ve changed just about everything on this truck, we’ve nonetheless succeeded with our aim: to capture the heritage of the previous FH and at the same time give the new truck a more composed, self-assured attitude,” concludes Rikard Orell. 

Watch a film about the design process here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y194ZJioiwI


For further information, please contact: 

Ida Mattsson?PR and Media Relations
+46 31 323 63 42?E-mail: ida.mattsson@volvo.com

New Zealand has not supported and endorsed the Doha agreement which would be the second phase of round of Kyoto Protocol. The government however says that it can buy UN Certified Emission Units until 2015.


New Zealand has not supported and endorsed the Doha agreement which would be the second phase of round of Kyoto Protocol. The government however says that it can buy UN Certified Emission Units until 2015. 

Volvo Trucks’ new Fuel Advice service helps haulage firms reduce their fuel costs. A fuel advisor assists them with both planning and follow-up of their fuel consumption. The results are long-term, with savings as high as 5 percent.


Save up to 5 percent fuel with the new Fuel Advice

Volvo Trucks’ new Fuel Advice service helps haulage firms reduce their fuel costs. A fuel advisor assists them with both planning and follow-up of their fuel consumption. The results are long-term, with savings as high as 5 percent.

Fuel costs represent between 25 and 35 percent of total haulage firm costs. At the same time, the hauliers' profit margins are often very small, which means that every saving makes an important difference.
"In order to succeed in cutting the haulage firm's overall fuel consumption, the part played by the drivers is vital. Our driver training courses in eco-driving have proven themselves to be effective, but without professional follow-up the results are often short-term," says Mikael Lidhage, Fuel Management Director at Volvo Trucks.
That is why Volvo Trucks is now launching Fuel Advice, a personal fuel advisor whose aim is to help hauliers cut their fuel costs while at the same time maintaining these improvements in the long-term perspective. The service consists of three modules: Fuel Coaching, Fuel Management Toolbox and Fuel Management Support. The system requires that the haulage firm also appoints a specialist who is responsible for fuel efficiency and who handles all contacts with Volvo's advisor.
The whole point of the service is to improve the quality of all fuel-saving measures. By giving the customer ongoing feedback, these measures become increasingly natural and easy to use.
"An engaged and focused customer who has open channels of communication with his drivers, with the company's own fuel economy specialist and with Volvo's fuel advisor, can fairly easily cut fuel consumption by between three and five percent," relates Mikael Lidhage.
Fuel Advice complements Volvo Trucks' existing Fuel Management Service, which is primarily designed for larger haulage firms.
"With Fuel Advice even smaller haulage firms have the chance of benefiting from personal supervision and their own fuel advisor," summarises Mikael Lidhage.
Fuel Advice is available with the new FH Series. For previous models equipped with Dynafleet, it will become available as of the start of next year.
The service will initially only be available in Europe.
Facts about the three Fuel Advice modules:
1.) Fuel Coaching ?The fuel advisors register and analyse each driver's individual driving techniques, and this data is summarised in monthly reports. The advisors provide practical tips on how fuel consumption can be reduced, as well as help with planning and with structuring the necessary follow-up. If a driver suddenly changes his or her driving style in a way that requires fast feedback and perhaps also action, the haulage firm's fuel economy specialist is notified.
2.) Fuel Management Toolbox?A web-based toolbox with tools that provide inspiration, guidance and practical information about the best and simplest ways of working with fuel savings.
3.) Fuel Management Support?The customer's interface for contacts with his or her individual fuel advisor, who is there to answer questions and offer advice.


For further information, please contact: ?Ida Mattsson, Media Relations, Volvo Trucks Global Brand, phone +46 31 323 63 42?E-mail: ida.mattsson@volvo.com 

Efforts are on to extend the pollution limits which were under the Kyoto Protocol through a pact being discussed in Doha, Japan, Russia, Canada, New Zealand and some other resist to new emission cap


The efforts are on to extend the pollution limits which were under the Kyoto Protocol through a pact being discussed in Doha. More than 190 nations have endorsed the draft agreement. Under the agreement 37 nations which are a part of Annex B will be under emissions caps. Countries like Japan, Russia, Canada and New Zealand which have resisted agreeing to the agreement will not be able to buy  Certified Emissions Reductions under the United Nations treaty.

Sunday, December 9, 2012

SKF mainshaft bearings chosen for Hyosung’s first 5 MW offshore wind turbine


SKF mainshaft bearings chosen for Hyosung’s first 5 MW offshore wind turbine

“For such an important and new development project we had to be as sure as possible with our choice of mainshaft bearing supplier”. So said Dong-Young Han, General Manager of System Engineering in Hyosung Wind Energy Division, responsible for one of the first 5 MW wind turbines expected to be erected in offshore Korean waters. 

“Many parts of a wind turbine are important but if we talk about critical components, then the mainshaft bearings are certainly among those considered by all turbine manufacturers. These bearings are big, subject to very heavy and changing loads, and the generation of electricity cannot be made if they fail. Because the turbine is the first prototype of the series that we will supply to the Government initiated farm of 500 offshore turbines generating 2,500 MW, which will be Korea’s first offshore windfarm, we took the decision with great care to select SKF as the bearing supplier.”

“As all in the industry know, once these turbines, and bearings, are installed offshore they are exposed to the normal, but changeable, conditions of wind, rain, heat, variable loads etc, but in addition have to cope with salt water spray that puts additional emphasis on reliability of key components. Rectifying a bearing failure in a turbine out at sea can involve extremely high costs and is a complicated process due to the difficulty to get men and machinery to the ‘site’ in a way that enables the repair work to be carried out. With this in mind we looked to select a supplier with proven experience both in offshore wind turbines, and the design and manufacture of reliable bearings under such severe operating conditions.”

5 MW; a new experience

The Hyosung HS139-5MW turbine is a new project for the company who until now has produced 750 kW and 2 MW land based turbines. The scaling up to a 5 MW turbine for use offshore is not at all an easy thing to do, and a lot of engineering knowledge, calculations and test are needed to succeed. Regarding the choice of mainshaft bearing supplier Mr. Youk Song, Hyosung leader of drivetrain development explains, ‘we looked at 3 or 4 potential suppliers, but after thorough discussions in our team, quickly came to the conclusion that we felt SKF would be our best choice. 
SKF has already delivered mainshaft bearings for other 5 MW offshore turbines in Europe and we felt their experience, engineering and calculation knowledge could be relied on. 

Furthermore we had worked with them on our 750 kW and 2 MW turbines and were very happy with their calculations, bearing choices and the bearing performance, but also the cooperation and support offered with regard to a concern we had on drivetrain tolerances for our 2 MW turbine. Since that was a new turbine design for us at the time, we were not 100% sure of the drivetrain stack-up tolerances we calculated. SKF evaluated the tolerances, and we applied their recommended changes, which proved to be right thing to do. In addition we received full training on bearing mounting for the mainshaft, and their experience in these aspects of wind turbine design and construction was very useful and important for us. 

Another important issue for the 5 MW project was that we had a very tight time schedule, and SKF assured us they could deliver all that was necessary to propose and verify design solutions. In view of our past cooperation with SKF we felt confident that they would meet our targets. And they did!”

The new 5 MW turbine is a relatively compact design and has a new drivetrain concept for the 5MW class of turbines. It’s axially stiff rotor shaft assists in reduction of shaft dynamics that improves gearbox reliability. And the gearbox is constantly centered using an elastomer hydraulic gearbox arm support. It will have a hollow rotor shaft supported by two bearings in a single housing. This ‘unit’ design of the bearing assembly eases handling and mounting, and will reduce the weight at the top of the turbine by an estimated 10-15% compared to other potential solutions. 

The choice of bearing types represents a new combination, since the selected double row cylindrical bearing at the upwind end, and the double row taper roller bearing that is downwind is a combination not used in previous large size geared turbines, and can operate in offshore locations with wind conditions ranging from low to strong. The wind conditions at the Korean offshore location are, on average, relatively low; 6-7 metres per sec. 

While the bearing types are basically ‘standard’, these particular bearings have been manufactured with special features to optimize carrying capacity for this application such as; use of slim roller sets in the 1500 mm bore double row cylindrical bearing, profiled outer races to accommodate contact stresses, a special inner ring for the double row taper bearing to improve the mounting, and case hardening of the taper bearing (radially and axially) to reduce the effect of shock loads that could lead to ring cracking.

A full year of testing in 2013

The turbine will be assembled during 2012 and it is expected to gain full certification against the specifications required in the Government’s plans. The first two Hyosung offshore turbines are expected to be erected in the sea South West of Korea, as part of a 100 MW test site delivering electricity to the mainland. Further turbines will be added until 2019, when the full generating capacity will be realized. Summarizing what for Hysoung has been an exciting project Mr. Han said, ‘With this new first 5MW turbine we are very hopeful that many of the turbines that will finally be installed in the windfarm will bear the Hyosung name!”

For further information, please contact:
Colin Roberts
SKF Group Technical Press
colin.roberts@skf.com 

Saturday, December 8, 2012

Shares rose after JinkoSolar Holding Co. got financing of about $1 billion from China Development Bank Corp.


JinkoSolar Holding Co. has got financing of about $1 billion from China Development Bank Corp.. The share of the company rose  by 14% as it shows that the Chinese government is backing the firm. 

SKF Energy Efficient bearings prove their worth at Indonesian textile plant


SKF Energy Efficient bearings prove their worth at Indonesian textile plant

Along with the rest of Indonesian industry, PT. Leuwijaya Utama textile company, (Leuwitex), was confronted with a government enforced increase in electricity costs in July 2010. For Leuwitex it meant an increase of approximately 18%. For a company with 300 textile weaving machines and 176 twisting machines consuming 2,120 megawatt-hour (MWh)
per month in their Bandung factory, this represented a major increase in operating costs, and one that needed a speedy reaction in order to reduce the effect on the threat to bottom line profitablility. 

Immediately after the increases were announced the management of the Leuwitex Bandung factory set about searching for ways to reduce energy consumption throughout the entire factory. As well as ensuring unnecessary lighting, standby machinery etc was switched off, they took a detailed look at the production. The factory, one of three in Indonesia, produces some of the most sought after fabrics in Indonesia, and exports to Middle East, Malaysia and Europe. Over the years Leuwitex have developed their design and manufacturing techniques to create a range of fabrics, including a lot of custom-made fabric, that customers report has exceptional feel, design and wear properties that has placed them among the top 10 producers in Indonesia.

Focus on twisting machines 

To produce the daily volume of almost two tons of fabric the Bandung factory has the usual range of textile machinery including electric motors, weaving machines, spinning machines and twisting machines etc. First investigations showed that 30% of the factory’s energy consumption was consumed by the twisting machines, an important piece of machinery that is critical to fabric quality. So as well as taking measures to correct electric motor energy losses and optimizing frequency converters for the overall electricity supply, the energy consumption of the twisting machinery was discussed. Mechanically these machines are fairly straightforward; a series of lines of high precision spindles are driven by two powerful motors. Frictional losses…..energy losses, occur in the rotational motion as these machines operate 24 hours per day, by virtue of the quality of the bearings fitted at each end of each spindle. With 176 twisting machines, each having 256 spindles, this was clearly an opportunity for energy saving.

Evaluating the options 

Mr Zenzen, Leuwitex Plant Manager decided on a very practical and specific way to investigate a way to reduce energy consumption for the long term. He would select three of the most likely ways to optimize bearing cost and frictional losses and put them to test in his spindles. The three potential ‘solutions’ were;

1. New bearings from the supplier of those in the original spindles (not SKF)
2. Low cost bearings of local Chinese manufacture
3. SKF Energy Efficient bearings, claiming up to 30% friction saving.

Mr Zenzen fitted the bearings to three separate spindle lines and ran them for three months, monitoring specifically the energy consumption of those three lines. The result was an overwhelming victory for the SKF Energy Efficient bearing, with around 10% total energy savings. Extrapolating this result to the expected lifetime of the spindles would conclusively save the most energy and deliver the lowest total cost of operation.

“Having satisfied myself on the energy savings issue, said Mr Zenzen, I needed to also be sure that the overall SKF bearing performance was equally reliable in the spindles that are so critical to the final product quality. The twisting machines have two contra spinning spindles rotating in synchrony in opposite directions. To maintain product quality it is of utmost importance that these two spindles are rotating exactly as expected through the entire and continuous spinning/twisting operation”. 

Extending tests to a production run

So Mr Zenzen’s next test was to fit SKF Energy Efficient bearings to 10 twisting machines and begin a ‘production run’. “I was delighted to find that the product quality was exactly the same as before with constant, uniform delivery of the various designs, material thickness and feel. This was especially important because we were in the process of expanding and also replacing some machinery in readiness for a new fabric product, and needed to be sure we could rely on the machinery” 

This initial test was extended by adding more lines of spindles while keeping the original 10 operating. Regular product quality checks among all the machines convinced Mr Zenzen that he had indeed found his answer to the best bearings for his textile machinery from both energy efficiency and bearing performance point of view. “I was extremely happy at the outcome of this ‘project’, said Mr Zenzen. We took the right amount of time to be sure we had done all that was needed to be certain we had chosen the best solution for our original short term energy cost problem, and at the same time came to agree that it was equally the correct solution for our long term plans as well “

Reaping the rewards

The Leuwitex Bandung factory now has 25.600 SKF Energy Efficient bearings installed on its machinery and are reaping the energy and financial rewards that Mr Zenzen first envisaged when he started his energy efficient project. 

SKF Energy Efficient bearings

The SKF Energy Efficient (E2) deep groove ball bearing is one of the SKF performance class of energy efficient bearings. SKF E2 deep groove ball bearings reduce frictional losses in a bearing by 30% or more when compared to a comparably sized standard SKF bearing. The performance increase comes from an optimized internal geometry, low friction grease and a special low-friction polyamide cage. Designed for grease lubricated, light- to-normal load applications, SKF E2 deep groove ball bearings also consume less lubricant than comparable SKF Explorer bearings and enable longer bearing service.

Shielded SKF Energy Efficient deep groove ball bearings can last twice as long as comparably sized shielded standard SKF bearings. This means that the number of bearings needed to run an application over its lifetime can be halved. In instances where an application is run-to-failure, these E2 bearings can conceivably outlast other components in the application.

Typical examples of applications for SKF E2 deep groove ball bearings include electric motors, pumps, conveyors, fans, textile spindles etc 


For more information please contact:
Colin Roberts 
Head of SKF Group Technical Press

SKF Group Communication
P.O. Box 2350, NL-3430 DT Nieuwegein
The Netherlands
Tel: +31 (0) 30 607 56 08 Mobile: +31 (0) 653 944 111
Fax: +31 (0) 30 604 38 12
colin.roberts@skf.com www.skf.com 

REDD Text Limps Out Of Doha – Healthy, Homeless, And Broke


REDD Text Limps Out Of Doha – Healthy, Homeless, And Broke
Author: Steve Zwick


UPDATE: As of 22:00 local time, high-level talks are continuing but no changes are expected to the REDD text. We will provide a more comprehensive wrap Sunday night or Monday morning. Please check back then.


7 December 2012 | Doha | Qatar | High-level climate talks continue here and may run until Monday, but negotiations on reducing emissions from deforestation and degradation (REDD) appear to have wrapped up for the year. 

Some parts of the text are now complete, and these are embedded in the most recent outcome of the Advanced Working Group on Long-Term Cooperative Action (AWG-LCA) – the negotiating track created at COP 13 in Bali, Indonesia and slated to end today. 

Other parts of the text remain unfinished, and these are now on the agenda for the next meetings of the Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technological Advice (SBSTA) and the Subsidiary Body for Implementation (SBI), which take place in Bonn, Germany in June. 

The critical issue of results-based finance will be picked up at workshops headed by two co-chairs – one from the developed world and one from the developing world, both appointed by the President of the COP.

That leaves the mechanism with $5.35 billion in public funds committed and $2.24 billion acknowledged and spent by both developed and developing countries, according to the REDD Database but that doesn't include the $500 million each pledged by Norway and the UK.

The Final Outcome

The "final" LCA text is available here, but several parties have already voiced objections to key provisions. Pargraphs 25 through 40, however, have not been challenged, and these are the paragraphs related to REDD. 

The text recognizes the need to talk about “ways to incentivize non-carbon benefits,” such as water filtration, biodiversity preservation, and the support of forest peoples, and it also calls on SBSTA and SBI to build a home for REDD by the end of 2013 – for, with the Kyoto Protocol gone as of Thursday and LCA wrapping up today, everything rolls over to the Ad Hoc Working Group on the Durban Platform for Enhanced Action (AWG-ADP), which is to deliver a binding global agreement by 2015 to be implemented no later than 2020.

Building A Home

Coming into Doha, REDD talks were split between SBSTA, LCA, and the Subsidiary Body for Implementation (SBI), and the Doha talks were supposed to create a roadmap for the ADP. When it became clear that wasn’t going to happen, however, Papua New-Guinea (PNG) pushed for the creation of a new “REDD Committee” that would house all REDD talks. PNG created a detailed, three-page proposal that was gradually whittled down to a few bullet points and then banished to SBSTA and pushed off to June.  

Also left unresolved is how emission-reduction results will be verified. Last week, Norway pushed for third-party verifiers “drawn from the roster of experts,” referring to experts in both developed and developing countries, as opposed to the Consultative Group of Experts (CGE), which is a roster of experts which is balanced in favor of developing countries. 

Brazil balked, arguing instead for a continuation of the International Consultations and Analysis (ICA) process, which is substantially softer on developing countries. 

Brazil says it will deliver a formal counterproposal at the next SBSTA meeting.

The REDD Committee

As proposed, the REDD Committee would include members of developed and developing countries, and is aimed at creating a standardized REDD “product” within the UNFCCC that would send a clear signal on the value of forests to both governments around the world and the global private sector. 

Many delegates say the formation of such a committee is inevitable, but several said there simply wasn’t time to discuss it at these talks.


Steve Zwick is the Managing Editor of Ecosystem Marketplace. He can be reached at szwick@ecosystemmarketplace.com

http://www.ecosystemmarketplace.com/pages/dynamic/article.page.php?page_id=9475&section=news_articles&eod=1
http://www.wikio.co.uk